MADHYAMAM JOURNOS

WWW.madhyamamjournos.blogspot.com IS A NEW BLOG CREATED BY YOUNG JOURNALISTS OF MADHYAMAM, KERALA, INDIA FOR SHARE THEIR THOUGHTS AND ARTICLES. FOR CONTACT US: madhyamamblog@yahoo.co.in

Saturday, June 18, 2005


K.P RASHEED. THE NEW VANIMEL BOY Posted by Hello

A JOURNEY THROUGH PEACE


Nadapuram was once a land of political violence.
In 1988 this village saw brutal murder of nine people in the
name of politics. The first political murder in Nadapuram was in 1973.
A cpm activist killed by opposite group.
After that incident Nadapuram became an ‘island of blood".
15 years of violence, many people killed, hundreds of houses destroyed.
But now Nadapuram is a land of peace. no political violence...no murder....
How Nadapuram changed? k.p Rasheed, budding journalist of madhyamam
explain this amazing story in his feature. His five part feature published in
madhyamam daily last week (june 2 to june 7).

K.p Rasheed interviewed many political leaders of nadapuram.
They explained the village’s journey to peace. One exapmple
chalil sudheesh. Once he was a criminal, accused in 28 political
violence cases.
But now sudheesh changed like his village. Five years ago he said
‘goodbye’ to his violent life and became a meessenger of peace.
Chalil Sudheesh said "Always violence kills human life.
Now i understand life is a gift of god.
Now iam living with my family peacefully.
K.p Rasheed’s article tells us this type of many stories from
the heart of Nadapuram. the feature titled
"samadhanathinte nadapuram padangal"
(lessons of peace from nadapuram) got great attention
from readers of kerala and gulf.

Vanimel , the northern village of calicut contributed
severel men of letter’s like Moidu vanimel,
Sooppy vanimel, Kunhikkannan vanimel etc........
But no doubt this vanimel boy, K.P Rasheed
marks his name above all of them.
you can contact mr. K.P Rasheed. his mobile 9895080424.

Friday, June 17, 2005


muhammed suhaib's article in madhyamam weekly. insight muhammed suhaib. Posted by Hello

Muhammed shuhaib’s article got great attention

Muhammed shuhaib, one of the budding journalists of madhyamam got great attention from readers through his article on emergency published in madhyamam weekly. (june 17 issue, emergency special).
suhaib tells us experiences of a journalist during india’s emergency period. In his article he describes the life of Kovalam Chandran, once a revolutionary journalist.
in the first stage of emergency kovalam chandran attacked indhiragandhi’s decision through his fornightly ‘kerala delux’.

but police and burocrats haunted him and compelled him to turmoil.
Kerala delux published an editorial on june 26 , 1975 with the title ‘the beginning of indhira fasicm ‘. but continuos police brutality changed kovalam chandran’s mind. he withdrew all his revolutionary visions and finally his kerala delux published an editorial for praising emergency.
muhammed suhaib interviewed kovalam chandran, now he is an ordinary merchant in thiruvananthapuram.
suhaib’s article explains how fascism kill an impartial journalist. Muhammed suhaib now working at madhyamam thiruvananthapuram desk. his views and language as a journalist is really great.

u can contact muhammed suhaib
mdsuhaib@yahoo.com
mobile: 9895056009

Thursday, June 16, 2005


pk savad rahman Posted by Hello

Between the black and red light

dear friends,
here is the english version of savadrahman's international award winning article.
this article by p.k savadrahman got developing asia award 2005. malayalm version of this article was published in our daily last year.

RELATED INTERNET LINKS:
http://www.deepikaglobal.com/archives/ENG3_sub.asp?hcode=97975&ccode=ENG3&newsdate=04/02/2005

http://www.adbi.org/winners.2005.special/

http://www.adbi.org/winners.2005.women/

you can contact mr. Savad Rahman savadbai@gmail.com
cell: 09846085873



Between The Black and The Red Light

(Translation of the article "chillumedayilirunn kalleriyoo")
By Savad Rahman

Mumbai is truly one of a kind. You might have been residing here for a decade or more but still you can’t be absolutely certain of your way. Andheri, Dadar, Navi Mumbai… the longer you travel the more you get confused. Such is the traffic and human convergence associated with this great city that, it could take hours to move from one point to another. But Kamathipura has always been an exception, in more ways than one.
Catch the time-bound city train service, or the red colored city bus 102 or the taxis painted in black and yellow; the means to reach the place has never been short of options. Under the guise of gentlemen, a clutch of strange friends will guide you, round-the-clock, to the world of flesh trade where many innocent dreams get shattered and fate plays havoc with millions of female lives.
Irrespective of their economic or social differences people from different walks of life used to be a regular visitor to this place, which has been shared and owned between pan, panipoori, juice vendors and multi colored buildings adorned with lamps. So one thing is clear, the AIDS cell got it completely wrong when they recorded that most of the customers were confined to long distance lorry drivers.
The list of customers who buy sexual release in these sleazy bars covers posh-driven bureaucrats to the political big fishes to the agents of rich Arabian sheikhs and white skinned foreigners to the tourists from within and abroad and to those job hunters and interviewees. There is no other place on earth where they can cheaply vent their sexual desire. The information divulged by World Sex guide stands testimony to the said fact.
But don’t get mistaken, the average turnover that has been churned out by this flesh market is equivalent to that of the revenue generated by the Mumbai share market or the diamond market at Saveri. And more than 70 percent of the sex workers in the biggest ‘red street’ are in their early teens. What else can give you a more staggering picture?
Apart from the courtesans who have been engaged in the oldest known respect-less job, the region has been a safe haven for those stray dogs, goons, pimps, and innocent kids. From the time of the British rule it has been known as Mumbai’s "comfort zone". History mirrors that Kamathis who worked here, as builders and craft workers, from the state of Nizam, had been the origin of civilization in this part of the world.
The way they came ….
It’s been seven years since her stepfather hoodwinked Rupa chikdar. Before leaving he had promised Rupa to take her home every month. But he never came back. From Kolhapur to Mumbai, Rupakchidar has come of ages. She is now matured enough to differentiate the chaff from the grains. The monkey toy that was being presented by her stepfather was still at her drawing room, grinning at the visitors.
Like Rupa chikdar, Anamika also ended up here as a result of a well-laid trap. A family friend offered her a lift, when she was on her way back from a party. As soon as she regained consciousness her memory bank was completely blank. It was too late when she realized the trap that befell on her. She fought her best against the evil desires of sex mongers and mercenaries. she was not ready to do any thing against husband and god. But her cries fell on deaf ears. Malabhai’s goons treated her with utter disdain. They put her in the dark room completely deprived of even drinking water. Ultimately they had threatened to kill her child. Anamika was left with no other option but to yield. She was being forced to select the path she hated for so long.
Here starts the show ….
The pimp would leave the scene after bagging the money that was guaranteed to him. Now she belongs to the ‘Didi’ or ‘Madam’ who bought her for a sum that ranges between Rs 25,000 and Rs 2, 00,000. It all depends upon the physical worth of the ‘commodity’. The ‘Didis’ hardly bother about the money spent, as they would earn a princely sum of Rs 25, 00,000 by selling her for a period of 6 years.
In the beginning the brothel owner will order the victim to follow his/her instructions, if she continues to refute they would resort to third degree methods like applying hot metal bars against genital organs or by tormenting her kid. A fleet of experts will be at hand to train the new arrival.
Only God and death could rescue her once she was netted. In most cases, she was being betrayed by her husband or lover. Yes, the world has become a more difficult place for women to survive. In a frantic effort to escape from the ills of infidelity, dowries, insurgencies and calamities she had been forced to cave in for the evil desires.
What is common between Manisha Koirala and these girls
Recently a Hindi film titled ‘Market’ hit the screens with Maneesha Koirala as the lead character ‘Muksam Banu’. Even though the film had nose-dived in the box office it successfully portrayed the revenge of a girl who was being forced into prostitution, as a result of her wedlock with an Arab. The film also allowed thousands of Nepali girls to breathe in respite, as many of them were subjected to merciless betrayal after being illegally deported to India. Through the reel world Maneesha had done what the girls couldn’t do in the real life.
Whether it was sheer coincidence or resulted from a thoughtful move by the director, the Nepal-born Maneesha was a perfect fit to the role. But the difference between Maneesha and the girls was quite stark. The actress might have been enjoying her leisure time in Mauritius or Switzerland when these scapegoats were confined to the dark cells of kamathipura, with their dreams got buried along with their clothes.
The queen of tinsel world would be startled to know that women between the age of 13 and 45 have been diminished to a sizable extent in her birthplace. These girls who are having a higher demand in India are ought to feed the lust of at least 12 men a day, who approached them for their ejaculatory stopover.
As Ruchira Gupta, the director of the documentary titled ‘the selling of innocents’ and the founder of the women welfare organization ‘Apne Ap’, pointed out "these girls were being tortured to the core sans providing any food and dresses. In fact most of the customers enjoyed doing brutal rape, if the girls were not willing to yield".
Unfortunately most of the pimps who have been in the business of trading Nepali girls belong to their own country. Two Katmandu citizens Renu and Bimal ran the Jhariwala whorehouse, until it was ransacked and destroyed by the ‘Rescue Foundation’ activists under the leadership of Balakrishna Acharya, last March. Then it was revealed that Rajaram Thokale the husband of Renu was an active member of the Village Development Committee. This was just another incident of unscrupulous behavior of the authorities.
What high tech pimps says…
Many children had been devoted to the temples by their parents, in order to plead for the blessings of local deity "Yellamma". Sadly, most of these girls were ended up as tools to satisfy the libido of insipid Poojaris and rich landlords. These so called ‘Devadasis’ invariably became part of the malevolent red street after failing to protect their chastity.
Most of the trains coming from Belgaum used to carry at least 10 to 20 ‘Devadasis’ per day. The situation in southern states like Kerala and Andhra was equally staggering. Hapless girls had been taken from their homes under the guise of getting employed in gulf, or in the Biscuit Company in Virley Parley or the Oceanic Products Manufacturing Company in Gujarat. A fresh inquiry might bring forth more stunning revelations about their fate. Still the hi-tech pimps say- the girls are always safe.
Nagpada police, who is in charge of Kamathipura, seemed to be bent upon preventing any illegal sex trafficking. But the real situation showed a different picture altogether. In some cases big bosses, from the Mumbai Police Department, themselves had appeared to tame the little girls who were in no mood to relent. Due to support from the top political brass these anti social elements were hardly being implicated and they in turn conspired with the criminals to widen their network
Being a mother at Kamathipura…
Neelopher was born in a reputed well-to-do family in Barelly. But her child was not that fortunate. Although being delivered in a shack room of Laila . In her hey days, Laila was a real money-spinner, now confined to the role of a grand mother as well as a maid for those women who delivered children sans any fathers’.
At Kamathipura, Neelopher did not want him to tread her path. Like any other mother Neelopher was also keen to impart her child with the best possible education. In an attempt to place him at the poor boy’s home, she did not think twice to explain the reason of her child’s orphancy as ‘father died due to tuberculosis’. Anyway, she succeeded in her attempt and has been a regular visitor to the school for quite some years. She was full of tears when she explained that never once she failed to please him by not getting him color pencils or cricket cards.
On Muhram or other special days, both of them together will visit the Darga of Haji Ali. But still she is afraid….what if the boy comes to know about her past one day.
Every mother is the same. The mothers at Kamathipura are not different. They too have dreams about their children and worried about their future. They never want their children to involve in the evil surroundings. The mother who prepares ‘Chapathi’ at the streets also keeps a bottle of boost; she wants brought up her child to be the next ‘sachin’-the cricketer.
The children of Shanthi and Anupama have been studying in a posh school in Dongrey. Thanks to the local social and political leaders, the Rakhi brothers of the women, who appeared as their parents in the official school records.
After being in the trap it is their duty to unembarrasingly beckon others to sleep with them. But no single individual of Kamathipura had wished to be part of this spiteful world and you cannot find a sex worker who has been working here with utmost satisfaction. It was not their testosterone surge but circumstances that shoved them to this ghastly culture.
Here, the million-dollar question remains. Why those political leaders who have been making all hues and cries to usurp power or social organization’s that have been ardently involved in giving Mumbai a facelift or any of us who boasts ourselves as strong proponents of equality and secularity, have failed to save her from the blushes.
The modern day MSW’s are very keen to work with the sex workers. Sadly their intention falls short of true integrity. They are least bothered about the victims’ rehabilitation but find great pleasure in educating the girls about the need to use contraceptives. A true testimony of how far the politicization of AIDS has reached.
Once she fell in to the trap, the travails would continue with her for at least 15 years until she becomes worthless for the ‘Didi’. After being in the brothel darkness for a major portion of her lifetime it would be impossible for her to get back to her normal self. Circumstances would force her to pursue her malicious life, may be at a different place.
Despite the developments in the great city, despite the baseless claim of India shining, the slum has remained the same. No matter which party rules the roost. But don’t forget, at anytime any girls from any one of the third world country (with out black cat protections or ‘z’ category security) can slip in to this horrible world. It might be you, or somebody like you, or somebody you like….
(Names mentioned above are real, because their fate can’t be changed by a mere change of name)
The end


MADHYAMAM JOURNOS Posted by Hello

Madhyamam- media revolution in the south

DEAR FRIENDS, HERE IS A MATTER PUBLISHED IN MILLI GAZETTE
http://www.milligazette.com/Archives/2004/01-15Jul04-Print-Edition/011507200429.htm
ABOUT OUR DAILY BY YASIR. A GOOD ARTICLE.


Madhyamam- media revolution in the south
By E. Yasir


A vernacular newspaper started a decade and half ago now prints seven editions, has more than 50 bureaus across the globe, occupies the third position in circulation and readership, employs a workforce exceeding 5000 and thousands of reporters and agents. This is the story of Madhyamam daily published in Malayalam, which is the official language of Kerala.

Madhyamam was born with a slogan of "A milestone in the news media," with a mission of value-based journalism and the role of 'voice of the voiceless'.

Madhyamam began its journey in 1987. At Silver Hills near Calicut, it was inaugurated by Kuldip Nayar, veteran journalist. Vaikom Muhammad Basheer, the doyen of modern Malayalam literature, saw in it the birth of a silver star. A prophecy that lent substance to the evolution of the paper. The paper was led in its infancy by luminaries like KC Abdullah Moulavi, former Ameer, Kerala state Jamaat-e-Islami, PK Balakrishnan and KA Kodungallur, two distinguished men of letters.

Madhyamam is run by the Ideal Publications Trust, which aims at providing non-partisan and value-based journalistic service beyond considerations of profit and the demeaning compulsions of the market. Its policy emphasises the need for the media to rise above sectarianism and market-driven profiteering pressures that have beset the post-Independence Indian journalism.

Madhyamam’s website introduces itself with the following words: "The launching of the paper was a landmark in Malayalam journalism. Madhyamam set new trends in news content, advertisements, visuals and social commitment. Sixteen years down the line, it can boast of achievements that are not small. It was with a lot of hope and greater apprehension that Madhyamam set out on a course that appeared too ambitious to scale. Hope, because a need for value-based journalism was keenly felt in Kerala, and there were a great number of readers who wanted something more than the incomplete and prejudiced half-truths that normally get touted as news in much of the mainstream media. And appreciation, because the challenges of the competition were forbidding. Madhyamam has in its own small way molded the reading habits of the discerning Malayali readers, setting the agenda for serious debates through its editorials, features and its weekly edition".

It did create history and has carved out a niche for itself in the field of journalism armed with these qualities. It is the pioneer in the journalism of morality at least in the state of Kerala. Morality in the sense that it strictly ignores cinema, lottery and other nasty advertisements while these form a substantial chunk of advertisements the mass media gets in our times.

Madhyamam has already made its presence felt — a presence that has meant unease for exploitative forces and relief for the downtrodden. It turned the scale against financial frauds like goat farms and fraudulent farms rackets, exposed the powerful liquor lobby, manipulative trade practices like multilevel network marketing companies and usurious institutions. It brought into public attention the travails of marginalized sections like the Adivasis and Dalits. It has also stood in the forefront of environmental causes, and ruthlessly exposed how the industrial giant Grasim in Mavoor near Kozhikode was squeezing the neighboring villages dry, and the polluter finally had to close down.

Though the founders and employees in large numbers are non-professionals, Madhyamam keeps its perfection. It upholds a careful strategy of presenting news. It takes a stand on issues , they international or national.

Madhyamam has been in the forefront in bringing out exploitation and injustices against any section of society. Many of such stories may be cited be it against multi-level marketing or supporting the adivasis in the recent police firing. Iit keeps a sharp watch on issues which concern the downtrodden, neglected, deprived and marginalized sections of society

A direct impact of Madhyamam was that many age-old newspapers where forced to change their attitude in presenting and promoting news, especially about Muslims. Madhyamam also helped the voiceless to get a place in the political and social arena.

During the elections to various legislative bodies, Madhyamam plays lively and creative role. It weighs strategies and manifestoes of both the Leftist and the United fronts, which are the two prominent coalitions in Kerala politics, assesses candidates and finally gives a clear message to the people.

This way Madhyamam participates in the process of nation-building. The readership of Madhyamam may be one which can be compared to that of The Hindu in English. It cuts across the barriers of religion, class and creed. The reason for this lies in it’s neutrality, ingenuity and the positive role it plays in shaping society. A very good illustration of this can be cited from the inaugural function of the Cochin edition of Madhyamam when Justice VR Krishna Ayyar, the prominent social activist, ended his speech waving his wrist in air and shouting, "Madhyamam zindabad, Madhyamam zindabad, Madhyamam zindabad"!

Madhyamam set a new trend of covering world affairs in greater detail. Its coverage of the Gulf War of early 1990s, the Afghan tragedies during the Soviet invasion and later the US onslaught, the September 11 attack and the consequent US-British aggression and a great many others, helped inform readers about the issues involved.

Apart from the five editions across the state of Kerala, Madhyamam also brings out two interstate editions. In addition to these, Gulf Madhyamam is published from three places in the Gulf: Bahrain, Doha and Dammam.

Recently the people behind Madhyamam have started Madhyamam Health Care Programme to provide financial assistance for treatment of individuals from weaker sections suffering from chronic diseases. This exhibits the social commitment of the paper. Hundreds of patients have already availed of this facility. Madhyamam management frequently publishes reports about this scheme.

Apart from the daily edition, Madhyamam also publishes Madhyamam Weekly, Sunday Supplement, Kudumba Madhyamam, i.e., supplement for families and children.

Madhyamam also issues career, education, business and info supplements every week. Madhyamam publications have set the terms for informed debates within Kerala society, firmly taking the side of the common and deprived man. It has reshaped the reading habits of the Malayali by focusing on real issues instead of the sensational sob-stuff and soft porn carried by the mainstream media.

In a nutshell Madhyamam has become a movement, rather a revolutionary movement. Replication of this movement in English is indeed the need of the hour.

Wednesday, June 15, 2005


madhyamam desk malappuram, noushad elangaman, s.m noufal, sreejith, m. abdulrasheed, inamurrahman, and pk savad rahman in this photo. Posted by Hello

OUR NEW BLOG

MADHYAMAM JOURNOS IS A BLOG CREATED BY YOUNG JOURNALISTS OF MADHYAMAM DAILY, KERALA, INDIA FOR SHARE THEIR THOUGHTS AND ARTICLES.

Madhyamam began its journey in 1987. At Silver Hills near Calicut, it was inaugurated by Kuldip Nayar, veteran Indian journalist. Vaikom Muhammad Basheer, the doyen of modern Malayalam literature, saw in it the birth of a silver star. A prophecy that lent substance to the evolution of the paper. The paper was led in its infancy by luminaries like K C Abdullah, P K Balakrishnan and K A Kodungallur.

The Ideal Publication Trust

Madhyamam is run by the Ideal Publications Trust, which aims at providing non-partisan and value-based journalistic service beyond considerations of profit and the demeaning compulsions of the market. Its policy emphasises the need for the media to rise above sectarianism and market-driven profiteering pressures that have beset the post-Independence Indian journalism. It calls for lending voice to the voiceless majority in the society.

The opening of the paper was a landmark in Malayalam journalism. Madhyamam set new trends in news content, advertisements, visuals and social commitment. Sixteen years down the line, it can boast of achievements that are not small. It was with a lot of hope and greater apprehension that Madhyamam set out on a course that appeared too ambitious to scale. Hope, because a need for value-based journalism was keenly felt in Kerala, and there were a great number of readers who wanted something more than the incomplete and prejudiced half-truths that normally get touted as news in much of the mainstream media. And apprehension, because the challenges and the competition were forbidding. Madhyamam has in its own small way moulded the reading habits of the discerning Malayali readers, setting the agenda for serious debates through its editorials, features and its Weekly.


Impacts – slow but steady


Madhyamam has already made its presence felt – a presence that has meant unease for exploitative forces and relief for the downtrodden. It turned the scale against financial frauds like goat farms and mangium farms, exposed the powerful liquor lobby and manipulative trade practices like network ‘chains’ and usurious institutions. It brought into public attention the travails of marginalized sections like the Adivasis and the Dalits. It has also stood in the forefront of environmental causes, and ruthlessly exposed how the industrial giant Grasim in Mavoor near Kozhikode was squeezing the neighbouring villages dry, till the polluter finally had to close down. Madhyamam has also withstood the current trend of sensationalism. It has resisted the tendency to portray women in titillating photos. It has turned down advertisements worth crores because they went against financial honesty or women’s dignity. Madhyamam set a new trend of covering world affairs in greater detail. Its coverage of the Gulf War of early 1990s, the Afghan tragedies during the USSR invasion and later the US invasion, the September 11 attack and the consequent attacks, the US-British war efforts and a great many others, informing the readers about the issues involved and helping for a pacifist and humanitarian attitude – even when it meant alienating powerful establishments.

Values that inspire
Journalism in Kerala is beset with the vices it faces elsewhere too. The press is rapidly getting commercialised; the papers cater to vested interests, shameful tendencies and an all-out dependence on advertisements that become more vicious by the day. But Madhyamam has been able to prove that a paper can be financially viable, that it can flourish without sentimental sob stuff or the lure of profit cards or insurance schemes or encroachments on women’s honour. Marketing strategies like these presume that readers are an easy target and can be manipulated. What Madhyamam offered to the readers is none of these, but the sheer value of unbiased news, the credibility of its contents and the integrity of its stand. When the media pander to the aristocratic or ruling class, they forfeit their credibility. Their overindulgence in power politics makes them vulnerable to vicious influences. When they mix news with views the educated readers have reason to distrust the entire news industry. A profit-driven media culture vitiates both itself and the society.

Madhyamam may not have made a revolution in this field. But it has proved that ethics are not only possible in journalism, but are viable too. While growing into a number of editions in record time, it has also kept within the limits of journalistic discipline both in editorial content and advertisements. The society certainly needs a paper that will, as Madhyamam has endeavoured to do, stand up to the evils in the society even at the cost of crores of rupees in advertisement revenue. In a highly competitive environment Madhyamam has dared to reject every month advertisements worth lakhs of rupees, because they seek to promote fraudulent financial practices, or present women in undignified ways, or publicise evils like alcoholic drinks, cigarettes, money chains, gambling and speculation, usurious ‘blade’ companies, goat farm frauds and the like. This is possible on the one hand because Madhyamam is run by a Trust that need not make a profit, but also because of the support it has received from the reading public. People are ready to back a venture like Madhyamam because they feel it is necessary.

Madhyamam believes that journalism, like any other human endeavour, must distinguish between right and wrong. A newspaper must also give generous space to dissenting voices, and hold aloft the model of value-based journalism. God willing, it will continue to tread the same path. We would ask you to pray for Madhyamam, and to offer us your valuable suggestions. It has proved a turning point in Malayalam journalism. It has to survive as the voice of the voiceless.
It has fought the divisive tendencies in the society, and exposed the superstitions that keep the doors open for exploitative forces.

A journey forward
The growth of Madhyamam in quantitative terms and in qualitative terms has been impressive. A mere decade and a half into publication, it has grown into six editions – at Kochi, Thiruvananthapuram, Kannur, Malappuram and Bangalore besides Kozhikode, and two overseas editions for Gulf Madhyamam, at Bahrain and Dubai.

Madhyamam Weekly is one among the most influential periodicals in Kerala, providing in-depth reports of social issues. It has brought into focus many political, cultural and literary issues that concern the society. In an explosive scoop, Madhyamam Weekly exposed the truth behind the death of the Naxalite leader Varghese, a truth that had been misrepresented by the establishment in collaboration with the mainstream media. Through this exposé, and the consequent official probe, it was able to show how an unarmed leader of Adivasis was brutally done to death by the police and later alleged to have died in an encounter. Madhyamam Weekly has, since its launch in 1998, set the terms for informed debates within the society, firmly positioned on the side of the common and deprived people. It has reshaped the reading habits of the Malayali by focusing on real issues instead of the sensational sob-stuff and soft porn carried by the mainstream media.

Madhyamam Annual is a cultural event accepted by the discerning Malayali for its informed discussion of issues that matter, as well as for its variety.